Musical Therapy

There is no doubt that music has the ability to impact the human body. After all, we respond to a beat by tapping to the rhythm, more than we respond to a flashing light or image.
Music therapy benefits patients of all ages: from using lullabies to help the development of premature babies to playing big band songs to boost elderly Alzheimer patients’ spirits and appetites. It really does not matter what music is used, although classical music is thought to be more relaxing to the human body.
Music, both vocal and instrumental, is considered to be of divine origin and is closely identified with the Hindu Gods and Goddesses. The Goddess Saraswati, depicted with Veena in hand, is venerated by all students and performers of Indian music as the divine patron of music and learning.
Similarly in the Hindu mythology, Krishna, by means of his flute, fills himself and the universe with bliss. He distracts everyone and everything from normal activity and enchants them to revel in ecstasy. His music explodes upon the world and society insisting that all else be forgotten. It is time, it proclaims, to join in his symphony of joy, to frolic in the forest, to scamper in play, to realize every dream that one has ever dreamed in his world of infinite possibility.

By Saanvi Mundra

Std IV B

V.C. W. AVM – Bandra (E)